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    I must say that your service is absolutely exceptional and I have recommended your company and products to several friends today; all are serious "printer" people.I retired last year and my friends are all into, or are still working in the photo industry. Sincerely,Gerhard

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    Dear, just to let you know than i realy appreciate your costumer service.
    Thank you
    Denis

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    Just a Thank you and all the best
    Grigore

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    Ce message est simplement pour vous dire que j'ai bien reçu la commande XXXXXX et que je suis très satisfait de la rapidité de la livraison et aussi de la qualité de l'encre. C'est la première fois que j'utilise de l'encre "autre que l'originale" et pour le moment je suis très satisfait. Soyez certain que je vais vous référez à mes amis et collègues de travail et c'est certain que je vais commander à nouveau de chez vous. Merci beaucoup.
    Stéphane

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    Je veux seulement vous dire un gros merci pour la rapidité avec lequel vous avez traité ma demande et aussi pour le petit extra en papier photos,c'est très apprécié.

    Céline

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    I received my order, thank you for your great customer service..
    Judy

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    Hello:

    It is not often people write emails or letters of praise but consider this one of the rare ones!
    I must say, ordering your product was about the easiest imaginable. Coupled with the fact that it arrived here basically “next day” I am thoroughly happy. To tell you the truth, I was expecting to have to go pay full retail for one black cartridge thinking that your’s would take at least a week to arrive but I was wrong, the order arrived before I could even go out to get one!
    Congrats people, I WILL tell all my friends and neighbours about you!

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HP to set up new R&D lab

AMERICAN tech giant Hewlett-Packard is setting up a new R&D lab in Singapore that will focus on improving the navigation and design of its printers.

HP is currently looking for a site for its new Inkjet Web Solutions Global Design Center, which is expected to be up and running by early next year, said the company’s executive vice-president for its imaging and printing group, Mr Vyomesh Joshi, in an interview with the Straits Times on Tuesday.

 

Within the centre – HP’s only such facility outside the United States – its researchers will look for ways to improve the company’s upcoming web-enabled printers, from more intuitive touch-screen menus to allow users to select pictures from online photo galleries, to connecting the printer to networking devices like home wireless routers with fewer clicks.

HP, which has a 46 per cent market share of the global printer market, will also be hiring experts in industrial design, ergonomics, and materials science to improve the look-and-feel of its printers, so they do not look out-of-place in modern designer living rooms, said Mr Joshi, a member of HP’s executive team, who received the Friend of Singapore award from President SR Nathan earlier on Tuesday.

Propelling liquid across a Surface (Inkjet Evolution ?)

Controlling the way liquids spread across a surface is important for a wide variety of technologies, including DNA microarrays for medical research, inkjet printers and digital lab-on-a-chip systems.

A symmetrical droplet (top) forms on a surface with straight nano-pillars, while on a surface with bent pillars (bottom) the droplet is asymmetrical, extending out only to the right. Inset images are micrographs of the surface structure

A symmetrical droplet (top) forms on a surface with straight nano-pillars, while on a surface with bent pillars (bottom) the droplet is asymmetrical, extending out only to the right. Inset images are micrographs of the surface structure

But until now, the designers of such devices could only control how much the liquid would spread out over a surface, not which way it would go.

New research from mechanical engineers at MIT has revealed a new approach that, by creating specific kinds of tiny structures on a material’s surface, can make a droplet spread only in a single direction.

A report on the new work, by Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Evelyn N. Wang and graduate students Kuang-Han Chu and Rong Xiao, was published on March 28 in the journal Nature Materials.

The system Wang and her team developed is completely passive, based on producing a textured surface with tiny pillars shaped in specific ways to propel liquid in one direction and restrict its movement in others. Once the surface is prepared, no mechanical or electrical controls are needed to propel the liquid in the desired direction, and a droplet placed at any point on the surface will always spread the same way.

It’s just the shapes on the surface that control how the drops spread, rather than the particular materials used, Wang says. The chips used for testing were made by etching a silicon wafer surface to produce a grid of tiny pillars, which then were selectively coated with gold on one side to make the pillars bend in one direction. To prove that the effect was caused just by the bent shapes rather than some chemical process involving the silicon and gold, the researchers, with the help of Professor Karen Gleason’s group in the Department of Chemical Engineering, then coated the surface with a thin layer of a polymer so that the water would only come in contact with a single type of material. The pillars are all curved in one direction, and cause the liquid to move in that direction.

"Nobody had really studied this kind of geometry, because it’s hard to fabricate," Wang says.

Wang explains that while this work is still early-stage basic research, in principle such systems could be used for a wide variety of applications. For example, it could provide new ways to manipulate biological molecules on the surface of a chip, for various testing and measurement systems. It might be used in desalination systems to help direct water that condenses on a surface toward a collection system. Or it might allow more precise control of cooling liquids on a microchip, directing the coolant toward specific hotspots rather than letting them spread out over the whole surface.

"It’s a big deal to be able to cool local hotspots on a chip," Wang says, especially as the components on a chip continue to get smaller and thermal management becomes ever more critical. The research was funded in part by the National Science Foundation, DARPA, and Northrup Grumman.

Mark Shannon, professor of mechanical science and engineering at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, agrees that this method might be further developed for a variety of applications, including biomedical lab-on-a-chip systems for the detection of specific biomolecules in blood, for example. "Droplet manipulation has been heavily developed for moving samples from station to station for different analysis steps," he says, and this new method might provide a useful way to do that with minimal energy requirements, but to do so will require the ability to create multiple regions on a surface that propel the liquid in different directions for each stage. "This research will help enable these unit operations," he says, in combination with related research currently being carried out in other places.

Howard Stone, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton University, who was not involved in this research, says researchers have taken several approaches to surface patterning and control in recent years, some inspired by nature and some by materials applications. "This research advance for one-dimensional asymmetric spreading is a nice addition to the toolbox for surface patterning to control liquid spreading," he says.

New Inkjet Paper Offers Look of Photo Lab Metallic Prints

Red River Paper introduces 66lb. Polar Pearl Metallic photo inkjet paper. The new Polar Pearl Metallic is a truly unique inkjet paper that closely matches the look of photo lab metallic prints. Polar Pearl Metallic features the same aspects as its lab equivalent – a high gloss finish and a pearlescent base stock that yields an elegant iridescence in your images.

Dallas, TX (PRWEB) March 26, 2010 — Red River Paper introduces 66lb. Polar Pearl Metallic photo inkjet paper. The new Polar Pearl Metallic is a truly unique inkjet paper that closely matches the look of photo lab metallic prints. Polar Pearl Metallic features the same aspects as its lab equivalent – a high gloss finish and a pearlescent base stock that yields an elegant iridescence in your images. The new paper is compatible with any inkjet printer and requires no special equipment, inks, or finishing techniques to achieve the metallic effect. Polar Pearl Metallic is part of Red River’s Polar family of products, which represent the absolute state-of-the-art in photo inkjet papers.

Red River Paper Polar Pearl Metallic

Red River Paper Polar Pearl Metallic

Kodak™ and their Endura™ Metallic process for photo labs originally made the metallic style print popular. After a number of years of research and development the same look and effect has been created for inkjet printing technology. Drew Hendrix, Vice President of Red River Paper notes, "The lustrous nature of Polar Pearl Metallic adds special depth and life to many different types of photography. The new paper expands the creative freedom and capability of inkjet users from the professional to the enthusiast level."

The lustrous nature of Polar Pearl Metallic adds special depth and life to many different types of photography. The new paper expands the creative freedom and capability of inkjet users from the professional to the enthusiast level.

Polar Pearl Metallic is now available for orders directly from Red River Paper at http://www.redriverpaper.com/ppm The paper will be sold in 10 different sheet sizes. Rolls up to 42” width will be available in the coming months. Color profiles for the new paper are available online for a wide variety of printer models – http://www.redriverpaper.com/profiles

Red River Paper was founded in 1997 and has become a trusted supplier of premium photographic inkjet papers to a wide variety of customers around the world. The company offers products that match or exceed retail brand quality with a savings as much as 40%.

If you’d like more information about Premium Polar Metallic, go to http://www.redriverpaper.com/press

Kodak and Endura are registered trademarks of Kodak, Inc.

iaPeel Inkjet Printable iPhone Skins

iaPeel Inkjet Printable iPhone Skins

If you don’t want to buy all those crazy iPhone cases that are on the market, and just want to customize your iPhone, you might want to check out the iaPeel Skins, which are rather interesting. What sets the iaPeel Skins apart from the rest is that they’re printable, so you can just load up the software on the computer, and print your desired image on it via your home inkjet printer. To make the deal sweeter, there are pop-up guides on the back of the printed labels, just to help you get the skins stuck on your iPhone properly. The synthetic material used by the skins are easy to remove, and fortunately don’t leave any of those pesky residues. The starter kit, which includes 5 skins will set you back $29.95, which doesn’t sound too bad if you’re into customizing your devices.

Brother, Canon, Dell, Epson, HP Japan, and Lexmark to kick off support for UNEP via collaborative ink cartridge collection effort

Brother, Canon, Dell, Epson, HP Japan, and Lexmark to kick off support for UNEP via collaborative ink cartridge collection effort

– TOKYO, Japan, March 23, 2010 –

Brother, Canon, Dell, Epson, HP Japan and Lexmark announced today that, as part of their Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project, a collaborative effort to collect used consumer ink cartridges, the six companies would begin making donations to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP, HQ: Nairobi, Kenya) on April 1, 2010.

The Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project, launched in April 2008, is a cooperative effort by six print device manufacturers and the Japan Post Group to collect used ink cartridges. The project was started with the belief that companies marketing inkjet printers have a social responsibility to recycle used ink cartridges and should work towards the creation of a recycling-based society through conservation efforts.

Representing a new facet of the Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project, the six companies will provide UNEP with donations to support its various activities targeting such global environmental issues as global warming, climate change, threats to biodiversity, and the efficient use of resources. By providing indirect assistance to UNEP activities, including forest protection and biodiversity conservation, the project will attain a higher level of social significance and take an increasingly active approach in global environmental protection.

Every six months, the Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project will make a donation to UNEP of three yen for every ink cartridge returned to any of the ink cartridge collection boxes installed at 3,639* major post offices and select local government offices across Japan. The first donation period will run from October 2009 to March 2010, with subsequent donations to be made every six months thereafter.

The six companies would like to ask its customers to help promote ink cartridge collection and recycling in an effort to contribute to society through donations to support UNEP’s environmental conservation activities.

The Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project’s UNEP donation activities will be featured at the Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project booth during the Interactive Fair for Biodiversity, which will be held concurrently with the 10th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (COP10) in Nagoya City, Aichi Prefecture, from October 11 to 29, 2010.

This marks the first time for the private sector in Japan to contribute to environmental conservation activities in the Asia-Pacific region through donations to UNEP, an indication of UNEP’s strong support for the project’s cause and content.

Lexmark eyed as a takeover candidate

Lexmark eyed as a takeover candidate

Company won’t comment on speculation

By Scott Sloan – ssloan@herald-leader.com

Bank of America has identified Lexington-based Lexmark International as a possible candidate for a leveraged buyout.

The printer maker was one of a handful of companies listed by the bank’s researchers as possible targets for these types of deals, which involve taking on debt to help finance the acquisition.

It’s another in a long series of rumors during the past several years of possible outside interest in buying Lexmark, which develops and manufactures laser and inkjet printers.

lexmark logo

Lexmark spokesman Jerry Grasso said the company declines to comment on rumors and speculation, or on its stock.

The company’s stock price has risen dramatically in recent months. In the middle of last year, the stock was hovering around $15 a share. On Tuesday, it closed at $36.82, up 5.53 percent from Monday.

The fact that the stock is trading at its 52-week high makes it attractive.

"These types of deals occur at market tops," said Tom Carpenter, vice president and senior equity analyst at Hilliard Lyons in Louisville.

Carpenter also noted Lexmark has significantly improved its printers during the past couple of years and focused on segments in which people print more.

Lexmark also is attractive, he said, because of the company’s cash reserves, which are about $15 a share. A drawback, though, is the company’s roughly $8 a share of long-term debt.

A great deal of the company’s cash is overseas, and that has prevented Lexmark from bringing it to the United States to finance continued repurchases of its stock, because the company would face certain taxes to bring it back. Carpenter said he doubts the overseas money would be a barrier to the deal because "there are people smart enough to find a way around that."

Carpenter said the biggest barrier might be deciding on a price. He said a 25 percent to 30 percent premium on the stock price "would be a home run for shareholders."

He said any number of private equity firms might be interested in Lexmark. Private equity firms use the money invested by their clients to acquire stakes in other companies.

Before the recession, the number of buyouts of publicly traded companies by private equity firms had risen substantially. Generally, a private equity group operates the company for a time, seeks to make it more efficient and then sells the company or parts of it for a profit. The recession slowed down that movement, but Bank of America analysts noted in their report that the deals might return and be smaller in scope, perhaps less than $10 billion.

Lexmark’s market capitalization is close to $3 billion.

Private equity firms also tend to eye companies with recurring revenue, which Lexmark boasts, Carpenter said. The company has recently announced some major deals to manage printing for large firms, including regional bank BB&T.

"The managed print services wins are very important because they are predictable recurring revenue streams, and investors and private equity firms love recurring revenue," Carpenter said.

The company already has a history with private equity. It was initially owned by a private equity firm — Clayton, Dubilier & Rice Inc. — when it was spun off from IBM in 1991. The company went public in 1995, and the buyout firm sold its last shares in 1998.

Read more: http://www.kentucky.com/2010/03/24/1194557/lexmark-eyed-as-takeover-candidate.html#ixzz0jIYxnD9O

HP Resolves Ink Cartridge Patent Infringement Complaint

PALO ALTO, Calif., Mar 18, 2010 (BUSINESS WIRE) — (HPQ 52.23, -0.12, -0.23%) today announced it has reached substantial resolution on the investigation by the United States International Trade Commission (ITC) into the importation and sale of patent infringing HP 02 inkjet ink cartridges.

The investigation, based on a complaint filed by HP on Sept. 23, 2009, alleged violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 in the importation into the United States and sale of HP 02 compatible inkjet ink supplies that infringed patents asserted by HP.

The ITC investigation identified 11 respondents: Zhuhai Gree Magneto-Electric Co. Ltd. of China; InkPlusToner.com of Canoga Park, Calif.; SmartOne Services LLC d/b/a InkForSale.net of Hayward, Calif.; Comptree Inc. d/b/a Meritline, ABCInk, EZ Label, and CDR DVDR Media of City of Industry, Calif.; Mipo International Ltd. of Hong Kong; Mextec Group Inc. d/b/a Mipo America Ltd. of Miami, Fla.; Shanghai Angel Printer Supplies Co. Ltd. of China; Shenzhen Print Media Co. Ltd. of China; Zhuhai National Resources & Jingjie Imaging Products Co. Ltd. of China; Tatrix International of China; and Ourway Image Co. Ltd. of China.

To date, HP’s ITC complaint has been resolved in the following manner:

— InkPlusToner.com and Comptree Ink have all entered into settlement agreements with HP regarding the investigation. These companies have agreed that HP’s patents are valid and infringed and, further, that each company will cease and desist from selling the cartridges in question. These parties also have paid HP an undisclosed sum of money. HP anticipates completion of a settlement with SmartOne Services consistent with the terms above.

— The Administrative Law Judge has approved Zhuhai Gree Magneto-Electric Co. Ltd.’s motion to terminate the investigation as to Zhuhai Gree based on entry of a consent order in which it agrees not to engage in the future importation of the relevant products.

— The Administrative Law Judge has entered default judgment against the remaining seven respondents. Upon review by the Commission, HP anticipates a satisfactory remedy from the ITC in the form of an Exclusion Order against the products at issue from the accused companies.

"HP is pleased with the outcome on these matters, and remains committed to vigorously pursuing legal enforcement against practices that do not respect HP’s IP rights," said Stephen Nigro, senior vice president, Inkjet and Web Services Business, Imaging and Printing Group, HP.

About HP

HP creates new possibilities for technology to have a meaningful impact on people, businesses, governments and society. The world’s largest technology company, HP brings together a portfolio that spans printing, personal computing, software, services and IT infrastructure to solve customer problems. More information about HP is available at http://www.hp.com/.