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    I must say that your service is absolutely exceptional and I have recommended your company and products to several friends today; all are serious "printer" people.I retired last year and my friends are all into, or are still working in the photo industry. Sincerely,Gerhard

    _______________________________________________

    Dear, just to let you know than i realy appreciate your costumer service.
    Thank you
    Denis

    _______________________________________________

    Just a Thank you and all the best
    Grigore

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    Ce message est simplement pour vous dire que j'ai bien reçu la commande XXXXXX et que je suis très satisfait de la rapidité de la livraison et aussi de la qualité de l'encre. C'est la première fois que j'utilise de l'encre "autre que l'originale" et pour le moment je suis très satisfait. Soyez certain que je vais vous référez à mes amis et collègues de travail et c'est certain que je vais commander à nouveau de chez vous. Merci beaucoup.
    Stéphane

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    Je veux seulement vous dire un gros merci pour la rapidité avec lequel vous avez traité ma demande et aussi pour le petit extra en papier photos,c'est très apprécié.

    Céline

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    I received my order, thank you for your great customer service..
    Judy

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    Hello:

    It is not often people write emails or letters of praise but consider this one of the rare ones!
    I must say, ordering your product was about the easiest imaginable. Coupled with the fact that it arrived here basically “next day” I am thoroughly happy. To tell you the truth, I was expecting to have to go pay full retail for one black cartridge thinking that your’s would take at least a week to arrive but I was wrong, the order arrived before I could even go out to get one!
    Congrats people, I WILL tell all my friends and neighbours about you!

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Hewlett-Packard adds defendant to patent suit

PALO ALTO, Calif. — Hewlett-Packard Co., the world’s largest PC maker, said it added a new defendant to an existing federal lawsuit over inkjet printer cartridge patent infringement and sale of products incorporating stolen components.

HP said late Thursday it is now also suing Asia Pacific Microsystems Inc., an affiliated company of UMC Group, both of which are based in Taiwan.

HP said it is adding one of its subsidiaries, Hewlett-Packard Development Co., as a plaintiff in the case. It is also making the same changes to the case before the U.S. International Trade Commission.

The PC maker filed the original lawsuit in March against MicroJet Technology Co., Mipo Technology Ltd., Mipo Science & Technology Co. and its America-based operations, SinoTime Technologies Inc. and PTC Holdings Ltd. saying the companies infringe on inkjet cartridge patents.

Shares of HP added 38 cents to $46.33 in afternoon trading.

Ink Amnesty Program

Well I thought I had seen all the marketing, and glitz for inkjet cartridges that anyone could come up with but here is one that could actually save you a dollar or 2 in the long run..

In a bid to win back  lost customers HP has created a HP Amnesty program.

Sort of comical…They will offer you 20% off your next purchase of NEW HP Cartridges, if you are willing to tell them about the woes of using competitors products.

Their TAG line is “SHARE your LETDOWN and WE’LL GIVE YOU 20% OFF ORIGINAL HP INKS”

Here is how it works..From the HP Site

“So you’ve tried bargain ink.

We want to hear
your story.

Did it ruin a pitch or smudge your child’s
birthday invitations?

Whether your letdown was monumental or just annoying, you don’t deserve disappointment!

In return for sharing your story, we’ll give you amnesty in the form of 20% off Original HP Ink.
So you can say goodbye to letdowns. “

Step 1

Register and tell us your experience of using bargain ink.

Step 2

To add to your story you can also scan or take a photo of your bargain ink letdown. It could be featured in our bargain ink letdown gallery.

Step 3

Check your email for your 20% off coupon to use on Original HP Ink online at the HP Home and Home Office Store. Your coupon will be sent straight to your email so you can start saving.

Of course if you are still looking at purchasing truly affordable HP compatible remanufactured cartridges, go no further than stopping by at Metawatch for your supplies.

Hewlett-Packard to sell 3-D printers in May

Stratasys Inc. shipped the first 3-D printers made with the Hewlett-Packard brand under a deal first publicized in January.

The printers will go on sale in France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom next month.

Minneapolis-based Stratasys (Nasdaq: SSYS) developed the printers with Palo Alto-based H-P (NYSE: HPQ). H-P, which has a 3,500-employee campus in Roseville, plans to sell them in the mechanical design market.

Three-dimensional printers use inkjet type technology to make solid models of machine parts and other complex shapes by “printing” them, layer by layer. Users can then test and assemble models of devices to see how well they work before making more costly components.

These printers can make a model directly from a CAD, or computer aided design software, file.

Scott Crump is chief executive officer of Stratasys. The company says it came up with the term “3D printer” when working with IBM Corp. (NYSE: IBM) in the 1990s.

Printer Cartridges Recycling

Check out HP and the Lavergne Group’s advanced processing technology, which is saving money and resource use.recycling hp printer cartridges by crushing into plastic flakes

MONTREAL — Recycling isn’t usually much fun to watch. Those blue bins aren’t too animated. And don’t we all suspect that as soon as the truck turns the corner it all gets thrown in the landfill anyway? That has actually happened in some places when the value of recycled material went into the toilet.

In some cases, we’re going backwards in recycling. Take just the case of plastic water bottles. We produce 29 billion of them a year, and only 30 percent get recycled, which means an escalating amount of waste (expressed in millions of tons).

But plastic water bottles are eminently recyclable, and earlier this week, in Montreal, I saw them put to good use. Hewlett-Packard, which makes the printer cartridges we all pay dearly for, isn’t content to let them go to landfills. These days, they’re being dismantled instead of shredded — a much cleaner process.

The company started recycling cartridges in 1991 (taking back more than 300 million from inkjet and laser printers), and is getting much better at figuring out how to reuse the plastic. Today, a pilot project in a French-Canadian factory is no longer shredding the cartridges (a process that leaves a contaminated mix of plastic, metal and paper), it’s dismantling them for 50 percent greater yields in recovered plastic. Here’s how it works, according to HP’s Dean Miller:

You can send your cartridges back to their maker in a number of ways (there are programs in 50 countries) and the options include mailing them back in pre-paid envelopes and returning them for credit to Staples stores. Either way, they end up at industrial facilities like the one I visited in Montreal.

But they don’t get crushed. In 2005, after five years of work, HP developed a closed-loop system for recycling printer cartridges that, at the Lavergne Group facility I visited alone, handles a million pounds of plastic every month. Closed loop means the plastic lives again as new cartridges. HP has made more than 500 million printer-ready cartridges through the closed-loop process since 2005.

The closed-loop process is like something out of the movie Brazil — a combination of retro mechanical and high tech. Dismantling (especially in this pilot scale) is much slower than crushing cartridges, of course. The dismantler handles 15 cartridge a minute, and the shredder thousands per hour. But the result is much cleaner: The robot arms scrape off the label, lop off the plastic lid, remove the electronic guts and the foam pad, then toss the remaining plastic bucket into a hopper.

Once shredded, the cartridge material is mixed with 75 to 80 percent plastic bottle waste and then (they wouldn’t let us see this part) combined with special chemical additives to make it strong and pliable — in effect, basically the same as virgin plastic again.

from bottles and cartridges to plastic pellets

Until recently, the process handled only easy-to-recycle PET plastic, but last year polypropylene (PP) was added and almost two million cartridges with PP have been processed.

After having received some flak on the issue, HP has also considerably reduced the packaging going into its ink cartridges. There’s no U.S. law mandating that kind of waste reduction, but so-called Green Dot laws in Europe and Asia give impetus to that kind of reform. Green Dot makes manufacturers responsible for their packaging, which in effect gives them huge motivation to reduce the amount they include with products. Buy toothpaste in the U.S. and it comes in the box; buy the identical brand in Europe and it stands on its cap.

Strong corporate lobbies discourage the European approach here, but on March 25 Maine became the first state in the U.S. to enact an extended producer responsibility (EPR) law. And some 19 states have rules requiring takeback of electronic equipment. A national law would tie all of this together, and it will be a brave legislator who shepherds a bill through to passage.

As a car writer, I’m always looking for an auto angle, and I found it in a Lavergne Group office displaying a number of auto parts, including a taillight assembly. They’re all made from plastic recycled in the plant. Lavergne has a contract with Ford to provide plastic for Econoline van front ends, and because of the strong European end-of-life vehicle laws it’s looking at setting up a branch to serve carmakers in Germany.

Knowing about all this should stay your hand when hit by the impulse to throw away that spent printer cartridge. Not only is there money in it (get thee to the nearest Staples story) but properly recycled it will again dispense ink.

HP to set up new R&D lab

AMERICAN tech giant Hewlett-Packard is setting up a new R&D lab in Singapore that will focus on improving the navigation and design of its printers.

HP is currently looking for a site for its new Inkjet Web Solutions Global Design Center, which is expected to be up and running by early next year, said the company’s executive vice-president for its imaging and printing group, Mr Vyomesh Joshi, in an interview with the Straits Times on Tuesday.

 

Within the centre – HP’s only such facility outside the United States – its researchers will look for ways to improve the company’s upcoming web-enabled printers, from more intuitive touch-screen menus to allow users to select pictures from online photo galleries, to connecting the printer to networking devices like home wireless routers with fewer clicks.

HP, which has a 46 per cent market share of the global printer market, will also be hiring experts in industrial design, ergonomics, and materials science to improve the look-and-feel of its printers, so they do not look out-of-place in modern designer living rooms, said Mr Joshi, a member of HP’s executive team, who received the Friend of Singapore award from President SR Nathan earlier on Tuesday.

Brother, Canon, Dell, Epson, HP Japan, and Lexmark to kick off support for UNEP via collaborative ink cartridge collection effort

Brother, Canon, Dell, Epson, HP Japan, and Lexmark to kick off support for UNEP via collaborative ink cartridge collection effort

– TOKYO, Japan, March 23, 2010 –

Brother, Canon, Dell, Epson, HP Japan and Lexmark announced today that, as part of their Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project, a collaborative effort to collect used consumer ink cartridges, the six companies would begin making donations to the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP, HQ: Nairobi, Kenya) on April 1, 2010.

The Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project, launched in April 2008, is a cooperative effort by six print device manufacturers and the Japan Post Group to collect used ink cartridges. The project was started with the belief that companies marketing inkjet printers have a social responsibility to recycle used ink cartridges and should work towards the creation of a recycling-based society through conservation efforts.

Representing a new facet of the Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project, the six companies will provide UNEP with donations to support its various activities targeting such global environmental issues as global warming, climate change, threats to biodiversity, and the efficient use of resources. By providing indirect assistance to UNEP activities, including forest protection and biodiversity conservation, the project will attain a higher level of social significance and take an increasingly active approach in global environmental protection.

Every six months, the Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project will make a donation to UNEP of three yen for every ink cartridge returned to any of the ink cartridge collection boxes installed at 3,639* major post offices and select local government offices across Japan. The first donation period will run from October 2009 to March 2010, with subsequent donations to be made every six months thereafter.

The six companies would like to ask its customers to help promote ink cartridge collection and recycling in an effort to contribute to society through donations to support UNEP’s environmental conservation activities.

The Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project’s UNEP donation activities will be featured at the Ink Cartridge Homecoming Project booth during the Interactive Fair for Biodiversity, which will be held concurrently with the 10th Conference of the Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (COP10) in Nagoya City, Aichi Prefecture, from October 11 to 29, 2010.

This marks the first time for the private sector in Japan to contribute to environmental conservation activities in the Asia-Pacific region through donations to UNEP, an indication of UNEP’s strong support for the project’s cause and content.

HP Resolves Ink Cartridge Patent Infringement Complaint

PALO ALTO, Calif., Mar 18, 2010 (BUSINESS WIRE) — (HPQ 52.23, -0.12, -0.23%) today announced it has reached substantial resolution on the investigation by the United States International Trade Commission (ITC) into the importation and sale of patent infringing HP 02 inkjet ink cartridges.

The investigation, based on a complaint filed by HP on Sept. 23, 2009, alleged violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930 in the importation into the United States and sale of HP 02 compatible inkjet ink supplies that infringed patents asserted by HP.

The ITC investigation identified 11 respondents: Zhuhai Gree Magneto-Electric Co. Ltd. of China; InkPlusToner.com of Canoga Park, Calif.; SmartOne Services LLC d/b/a InkForSale.net of Hayward, Calif.; Comptree Inc. d/b/a Meritline, ABCInk, EZ Label, and CDR DVDR Media of City of Industry, Calif.; Mipo International Ltd. of Hong Kong; Mextec Group Inc. d/b/a Mipo America Ltd. of Miami, Fla.; Shanghai Angel Printer Supplies Co. Ltd. of China; Shenzhen Print Media Co. Ltd. of China; Zhuhai National Resources & Jingjie Imaging Products Co. Ltd. of China; Tatrix International of China; and Ourway Image Co. Ltd. of China.

To date, HP’s ITC complaint has been resolved in the following manner:

— InkPlusToner.com and Comptree Ink have all entered into settlement agreements with HP regarding the investigation. These companies have agreed that HP’s patents are valid and infringed and, further, that each company will cease and desist from selling the cartridges in question. These parties also have paid HP an undisclosed sum of money. HP anticipates completion of a settlement with SmartOne Services consistent with the terms above.

— The Administrative Law Judge has approved Zhuhai Gree Magneto-Electric Co. Ltd.’s motion to terminate the investigation as to Zhuhai Gree based on entry of a consent order in which it agrees not to engage in the future importation of the relevant products.

— The Administrative Law Judge has entered default judgment against the remaining seven respondents. Upon review by the Commission, HP anticipates a satisfactory remedy from the ITC in the form of an Exclusion Order against the products at issue from the accused companies.

"HP is pleased with the outcome on these matters, and remains committed to vigorously pursuing legal enforcement against practices that do not respect HP’s IP rights," said Stephen Nigro, senior vice president, Inkjet and Web Services Business, Imaging and Printing Group, HP.

About HP

HP creates new possibilities for technology to have a meaningful impact on people, businesses, governments and society. The world’s largest technology company, HP brings together a portfolio that spans printing, personal computing, software, services and IT infrastructure to solve customer problems. More information about HP is available at http://www.hp.com/.

Rivals Hijacked Trucks to Steal Technology ?

SAN FRANCISCO (CN) – Well the latest rumour is Hewlett Packard claims Chinese and Taiwanese competitors stole patented printer cartridge components from HP’s factory in Singapore and copied them to sell made-to-order counterfeit HP inkjet cartridges on Amazon.com. "Trucks carrying HP parts were apparently hijacked while en route from the manufacturing facility in Singapore to the assembly plant in Malaysia … in direct response to the heightened security measures that had been implemented in HP production facilities," HP says.
     After stealing the technology, Hewlett Packard claims, Microjet Technology (of Taiwan) Mipo Technology (of Hong Kong and mainland China), and their U.S. affiliates, including SinoTime Technologies (of Florida) sold more than 300,000 of the inkjet cartridges in the United States. The defendants have the capability to make nearly 10 million counterfeit cartridges a year in Asia, Hewlett Packard says.
     The federal filing is the latest in a long line of complaints that China is making up its technology gap with the United States through industrial espionage, theft, and wholesale patent infringement.
     MicroJet "sells generic and/or made-to-order infringing ink cartridges to other companies, including defendants Mipo and PTC [PTC Holdings Ltd., of Hong Kong]," and sells them itself as well, Hewlett Packard says. HP claims the defendants violated six patents after stealing the HP components.
     Hewlett Packard says it discovered the scheme after seeing color ink cartridges for sale on Amazon.com and Craigslist, advertised as "HP compatible."
     HP bought some of the cartridges from Amazon.com, then used HP’s internal tracking database to cross-reference ID numbers on components, and found that the cartridges had "a genuine HP printhead and a non-HP cartridge body that closely resembled a genuine HP cartridge body."
     And it found that the printheads came from HP lots from Malaysia that had never been assembled by HP – "i.e., were identified as production gaps." All of these stolen items "were packaged in a ‘Mipo’ labeled box and were individually wrapped in a clear plastic interior packaging that is clearly consistent with the standard packaging for products manufactured by defendant Microjet," according to the complaint.
HP demands an injunction and damages for patent infringement, unfair competition and conversion.

Inkjet Printhead life

One of the most critical components of an inkjet machine is the printhead.

On average, every nozzle is expected to produce 20-50 billion ink drops during its lifetime (WOW) . This is considered to be the case for piezoelectric (piezo) heads; the type commonly used in Epson brand printers.

The other major brands (HP, Lexmark,DELL,and Brother) all use the thermal print head designs and the lifetime for thermal printing heads is substantially lower.

Resolution makes all the difference.

The frequency of ink drop production is directly linked to resolution and speed. For example, to print at a speed of 0.3 meter per second with a resolution of 1,000 dpi (the starting point for a graphic application), the head must fire with a frequency of 12,000 ink drops per second.

Assuming a “best case” average life expectancy of 50 billion total ink drops, the head then should be able to operate for approximately 1,150 total hours before needing to be replaced.

(Earlier for thermal heads)

What does that mean in terms of years of use, or paper use ?

1,150 hours relates to @ 10 pages per minute to about 690,000 pages or 1380 reams of 500 pages.

Or ,if you print for 1 hours every day ( 650 pages/day) your printer head would last you about 3.1 years.

Most people, print under 20 pages/day so that would work out to approx 102 years of life on your print head.

In effect, you more likely to have a power supply failure,break in the carriage motor, or other failure.

So why do so many people complain about head failures ?

Printer heads can and will fail if

a) the printer is operated without ink.

Ink in reality is a lubricant for the head assembly and without it the print head overheats and burns itself out. Just like your car need water in the radiator, you print head needs ink to keep it cool and conduct the heat away.

b) the ink is allowed to dry in the print head.

Ink, although specially formulated not to evaporate, is still prone to evaporate over time, and as a result the remaining (pigment, or dye) becomes concentrated and can eventually clog the heads. If you want to keep you printer running smoothly make sure you use your ink with 6 months of opening, and use the print head cleaning cycle on the printer at least once a month.

You printer needs ongoing maintenance just like your car, and that means the heads need to be flushed at regular intervals. Leaving your printer either out of ink, or with old ink in it is a formula for failure.

Ultra Violet inkjet OLEDs

Polymertronics is a technology enabler for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs).

They were set up in 2006 to develop technology to produce inkjet-printable, ultra-violet (UV) curable organic light-emitting diode fluids. OLEDs that can be printed on standard UV-inkjet equipment have many advantages.

UV-inkjet OLEDs - A new technology

They are much quicker and cheaper to produce than standard OLEDs, they can be designed and manufactured with very short lead times, they can be printed on to a range of exotic surfaces including flexible ones

What are UV-inkjet OLEDs?
OLEDs were first invented by Eastman Kodak in the early 1980s and development since then has been impressive. OLEDs are used routinely in many display screens, such as those for mobile phones and for low-level lighting of dashboards. Recently, substantial investment has been made in research for developing OLEDs to replace incandescent and fluorescent light bulbs as a primary lighting source.

OLEDs are produced by blending chemicals containing a light-emissive component with a UVcurable polymer. When printed, this mixture is then exposed to a UV light source and cured to a flexible solid within four seconds. The purpose they serve is for bespoke product displays such as 7-segment displays and the like.

The benefits of organic technology are numerous.

For both non-UV curable OLEDs and UV curable OLEDs, there are common benefits:

1. Printing on flexible and rigid media such as plastics, vinyl, glass and metal
2. Immediate product demand – zero lead time
3. Flexible media
4. Fast response to applied voltage for rapid changing graphics
5. Wide viewing angle of OLED devices
6. Very high definition for display

Beyond the common advantages, UV-inkjet OLEDs have further advantages:

1. Simple, fast manufacture
2. Low product waste results in a ‘green’ technology
3. Instant curing following printing
4. Print-on-demand technology
5. Zero product-volume loss during process

Where Can UV-Inkjet OLEDs Be Used?

OLEDs will add new and unparalleled layers of safety to consumer products. For example, it will reassure consumers that products and brands are genuine, that they have not been tampered with, and that they are within their use-by date.

According to the UK’s National Health Service, unclear packaging and labelling contributes to 25% of medication errors. The University of London has studied people reading packaging and found that 25% of fullsighted people have difficulty reading packets and other instructions.

Difficulty with reading information on packaging arises for a number of reasons. The label design or legal requirements may necessitate a smaller font to fit all of the information on the label. Integrating OLEDs into the packaging could highlight the most important details of a drug through an interactive display.

In the interests of sterility, many medical devices are used only once. For this to be viable, such devices must be cheap to produce. Inkjet printing enables a component of a medical device to be manufactured quickly and with significantly less tooling than is presently required. Further, medical devices are often sealed until they are used.
Advertisements can already be backlit, but with printed OLEDs the illumination can be incorporated into the advertisement itself relatively cheaply. There is no tooling required and print designs can be executed quickly. For a fast-paced industry such as advertising, this reduction in lead-time offers a substantial advantage.

Printed OLEDs could be extremely valuable in aiding anti-counterfeiting measures and in tracking goods in transit. Embedded customised data presents fraudsters with a new hurdle. Furthermore, tampering can be quickly and easily detected and data can be changed often to keep ahead of criminals.

What’s Next?
Inkjet testing of the OLED fluid has shown that further refinement of the OLED chemistry is required to enable fluid to be inkjet printed by Epson, or HP printer-heads, for when the formulation is for thin (bright) devices.