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    I must say that your service is absolutely exceptional and I have recommended your company and products to several friends today; all are serious "printer" people.I retired last year and my friends are all into, or are still working in the photo industry. Sincerely,Gerhard

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    Dear, just to let you know than i realy appreciate your costumer service.
    Thank you
    Denis

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    Just a Thank you and all the best
    Grigore

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    Ce message est simplement pour vous dire que j'ai bien reçu la commande XXXXXX et que je suis très satisfait de la rapidité de la livraison et aussi de la qualité de l'encre. C'est la première fois que j'utilise de l'encre "autre que l'originale" et pour le moment je suis très satisfait. Soyez certain que je vais vous référez à mes amis et collègues de travail et c'est certain que je vais commander à nouveau de chez vous. Merci beaucoup.
    Stéphane

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    Je veux seulement vous dire un gros merci pour la rapidité avec lequel vous avez traité ma demande et aussi pour le petit extra en papier photos,c'est très apprécié.

    Céline

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    I received my order, thank you for your great customer service..
    Judy

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    Hello:

    It is not often people write emails or letters of praise but consider this one of the rare ones!
    I must say, ordering your product was about the easiest imaginable. Coupled with the fact that it arrived here basically “next day” I am thoroughly happy. To tell you the truth, I was expecting to have to go pay full retail for one black cartridge thinking that your’s would take at least a week to arrive but I was wrong, the order arrived before I could even go out to get one!
    Congrats people, I WILL tell all my friends and neighbours about you!

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Canon Sues Chinese Companies to Block Copycat Cartridge Refills

June 29 (Bloomberg) — Canon Inc., the world’s largest maker of cameras and office equipment, filed patent-infringement claims against China’s Ninestar Image International Ltd. and retailers over technology in printer toner cartridges.

The claims target cartridges made by Ninestar and nine affiliated businesses in China and Hong Kong, as well as 10 U.S. companies that sell the products. Canon lodged a complaint yesterday with the U.S. International Trade Commission in Washington to block imports of the cartridges and filed a companion civil lawsuit in federal court in New York.

Canon, a Tokyo-based company that gets about 28 percent of its revenue from the Americas, contends the Ninestar cartridges infringe two U.S. patents.

The cartridges can be used in Canon and Hewlett-Packard Co. printers, according to the ITC complaint and the lawsuit.

The patents relate to the rotating drums inside the cartridges and how they connect to the printer. Laser beams scan across the drum in a pattern matching the image to be printed and powdery toner sticks to the device before being deposited on the paper, according to the complaint.

Canon said it opened a manufacturing plant last year near Newport News, Virginia, where it plans to produce “millions” of cartridges. The ITC is a quasi-independent agency set up to protect U.S. markets from unfair trade practices, including patent infringement.

Cannon in December settled complaints against companies in Japan, including Ninestar’s Japanese unit, over unauthorized inkjet cartridges. Officials with Ninestar didn’t immediately return an e-mail sent to their U.S. distribution center in City of Industry, California, seeking comment.

The ITC case is In the Matter of Toner Cartridges and Components Thereof, Complaint No. 2743, U.S. International Trade Commission (Washington). The civil suit is Canon Inc. v. Ninestar Image International Ltd., 10cv4999, U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York (Manhattan).

14 Hewlett-Packard Company Secrets From A Former Employee

Excerpts from ‘” The Consumerist” Ben Popken

A former Hewlett-Packard worker could barely wait for their non-disclosure-agreement to end so they could spill 14 company secrets to The Consumerist.

1: Many HP Printers, like their laser printers, have a built-in page-count after which they won’t work. This resides in the a transpart sometimes called image or drum kit. Rather than get the printer fixed, it’s often cheaper to buy a new printer, OR you can do a NV ram reset. It resets everything in the printer, including all the page counts, but it’s not without risks.

2: To get past the voice prompt system, repeatedly say "Agent." It will take two or three repetitions, but it will get you to a human.

3: If a set of cartridges cost more than the printer, don’t buy the printer. It’s considered a "throwaway" printer. HP service techs are told to spend no more than 30 minutes working on these because at that point, you are costing HP money.


4: HP cartridges have a warranty separate from their printer. The printer might be out of warranty, but the cartridges might not be. Cartridge goes plooey, call in.

5: Any HP printer that has been on the market for 6 months has its tech support outsourced. This means you might wind up talking to India, Canada or Costa Rica. Of the three, Canada at least speaks a variant of American.

6: If you have been told that you will receive a part by a certain date, follow up immediately. HP Parts Store was recently moved to Central America. HP Parts Store isn’t talking to HP Tech Support because the Tech Support CSR can see what is in the HP PS inventory and knows when they’re bullshitting. Every other part of HP hates HP Parts Store because of lost inventory, improper procedures, missed shipments, etc.

7: Using non-HP cartridges in your printer will void your warranty, and sometimes makes stuff blow up real good. The tech support will hang up on you if it is proven that the damage was caused by non-HP cartridges.

8: Just because the sales people say that your HP printer can use 120lbs paper doesn’t mean it actually can. You want the straight dope on a printer? Call up HP tech support or check the website.

9: If your printer is just out of warranty and you have a problem with it, call tech support anyway. You will first likely be directed to a "warranty agent." Tell them firmly that you have an "extended warranty" and they will forward you on to tech support under "customer claims warranty." The Tech Agent MUST give you support as per HP policy.

10: Don’t yell at the Tech Support CSRs. Most of them make just over minimum wage and just want to get the call over. If you have a problem, firmly request a supervisor.

11: If you threaten a lawsuit, HP CSRs are told to stop the call immediately and hang up.

12: Many HP CSRs are cross-trained into other departments. It doesn’t hurt to ask if they know about the product or problem if you get misrouted.

13. HP’s Beta Software website is at: http://www.hp.com/pond/ljbeta/. Only beta because it hasn’t been put on the distribution cds yet. A lot of drivers here will do stuff that the installation cds won’t. Also has fixes. HP maintains similar unadvertised websites throughout their system…

14. http://www.hp.com/pond/pnp Point and print = a new hp toy.

HP and Yahoo! team up to print ads in your home

By Rik Myslewski in San FranciscoGet more from this author

Posted in Music and Media, 17th June 2010 22:31 GMT

There’s been some knicker-twisting hubbub coursing the intertubes about ads being served up by HP’s email-enabled ePrint printers, announced last week at Internet World New York.

Each HP ePrint-enabled printer will have its own email address that will enable users to print by sending an email message to it. The idea is to enable users of mobile devices to email their print jobs to their printers at home, in the offices, or at public print services that could be set up in, for example, hotels and FedEx Office stores.

And, no, the intertubian brouhaha is not about the printers being spam targets — US law prohibits unsolicited ads being sent by fax, so presumably it would also ban spam from being sent to ePrint-enabled printers. The Reg would also suggest that HP should allow incoming email to be filtered by an opt-in whitelist address-management system, and not an opt-out blacklist.

At issue is instead HP’s Scheduled Delivery service, which will enable ePrint users to opt into such pre-scheduled deliveries as Yahoo! and MSNBC news feeds to which users can sign up through HP’s ePrint Center.

And these services will be able to add advertisements to their pages. In its announcement of the ePrint scheme, HP said:

The Scheduled Delivery service also opens up a new era of digital print advertising for HP and content partners. HP and Yahoo! plan to launch the service as a pilot program to help marketers consider ways to provide added value to their audiences by populating select print content from partners with customized messages, promotions and information like coupons or local services.

Due to the fact that each printer will have its own IP address, the content/ad delivery system will be able to sniff it out and target both content and promotional materials based upon the printer’s general location.

Computerworld quotes HP’s imaging and printing group headman Vyomesh Joshi as saying that the Scheduled Delivery service has to keep its eye on privacy: "That’s where we need to be very clear business rules in terms of privacy."

In HP’s limited pilot programs, said HP printing exec Stephen Nigro, "What we discovered is that people were not bothered by [an advertisement]. Part of it I think our belief is you’re used to it. You’re used to seeing things with ads."

And the opportunity here, according to HP, is huge. Speaking at the Conversational Marketing Summit in New York last week, HP inkjet-printing exec Tuan Tran that HP expects to sell "tens of millions of [ePrint-enabled printers] over the next three years." That number is not unreasonable, considering that HP will ePrintify all of its printers costing $99 or more. According to Tran, HP ships about 30 million printers per year, and about 50 per cent of the households in the US have an HP printer.

Tran described the HP-Yahoo! partnership in terms of ad-placement goals. "Yahoo! has a broad ad portfolio," Tran told the internet marketers at the CM Summit. When working with content providers such as PC Magazine and The New York Times, he said, "What we want to do there is actually get a subscription to those magazines delivered to your local printer, insert local Yahoo! ads and coupons, and build that out as an ecosystem."

And so if you subscribe to a Scheduled Delivery magazine or newspaper, it will come with ads — just like 99.9 per cent of all hard-copy magazines and newspapers. So what are people complaining about? Ink. "I won’t touch one of those things unless HP plans on sending me an ink allowance," wrote one commenter about the CW article.

A Bit-Tech writer asks: "Do you think that HP has a right to put advertising in the content it automatically generates for you, or is it wrong of it to cost you real money in ink used just to try and make a quick quid off your reading habits?" Commenters’ answers to that question included: "Are we getting the printer for free or something? What’s in for the customer in this deal?" and "If they give me free ink to print this **** out than I am all ears."

At TFTS, a columnist notes: "Some may balk at this, saying, why should I allow a company to use my printer ink to hawk products at me while I’m trying to get the paper? And they have a good point."

Over at Tech Whack, you’ll find the opinion: "User pays for the ink that is inside the printer. For every ad that is printed, some ink would be used. HP charges a bounty for their printer inks. This program might become useful in case HP is providing the cartridges for free."

You don’t even need to read the commentary from BitterWallet and DailyTech. Their commentaries’ titles are sufficient: "HP and Yahoo team up to make printing even more expensive" and "HP’s Web Connected Printers May Print Out Ads on the User’s Dime".

But at The Reg, you’ll find your humble reporter saying, instead: "People, people, people… Do you think that when you buy a newspaper or magazine you’re not paying for ink? It’s just that the publisher pays for it, and you pay the publisher."

Let’s wait until we see what the price differential might be between content delivered by the Scheduled Delivery service versus content delivered to your home by the postal service. Let’s not cavil until we see the terms of agreement.

At this point in time, this "to the barricades!" hue and cry is merely a tempest in an ink cartridge. ®

Bootnote

You’d think HP would have learned something from Apple’s repeated product-name transgressions. The name "ePrint" is already in use by a printing utility for the iPhone/Pod/Pad from Microtech, a suite of document-conversion utilities from LEAD Technologies, and a print shop in Portland, Oregon, among others.

Hewlett-Packard adds defendant to patent suit

PALO ALTO, Calif. — Hewlett-Packard Co., the world’s largest PC maker, said it added a new defendant to an existing federal lawsuit over inkjet printer cartridge patent infringement and sale of products incorporating stolen components.

HP said late Thursday it is now also suing Asia Pacific Microsystems Inc., an affiliated company of UMC Group, both of which are based in Taiwan.

HP said it is adding one of its subsidiaries, Hewlett-Packard Development Co., as a plaintiff in the case. It is also making the same changes to the case before the U.S. International Trade Commission.

The PC maker filed the original lawsuit in March against MicroJet Technology Co., Mipo Technology Ltd., Mipo Science & Technology Co. and its America-based operations, SinoTime Technologies Inc. and PTC Holdings Ltd. saying the companies infringe on inkjet cartridge patents.

Shares of HP added 38 cents to $46.33 in afternoon trading.

Ink Amnesty Program

Well I thought I had seen all the marketing, and glitz for inkjet cartridges that anyone could come up with but here is one that could actually save you a dollar or 2 in the long run..

In a bid to win back  lost customers HP has created a HP Amnesty program.

Sort of comical…They will offer you 20% off your next purchase of NEW HP Cartridges, if you are willing to tell them about the woes of using competitors products.

Their TAG line is “SHARE your LETDOWN and WE’LL GIVE YOU 20% OFF ORIGINAL HP INKS”

Here is how it works..From the HP Site

“So you’ve tried bargain ink.

We want to hear
your story.

Did it ruin a pitch or smudge your child’s
birthday invitations?

Whether your letdown was monumental or just annoying, you don’t deserve disappointment!

In return for sharing your story, we’ll give you amnesty in the form of 20% off Original HP Ink.
So you can say goodbye to letdowns. “

Step 1

Register and tell us your experience of using bargain ink.

Step 2

To add to your story you can also scan or take a photo of your bargain ink letdown. It could be featured in our bargain ink letdown gallery.

Step 3

Check your email for your 20% off coupon to use on Original HP Ink online at the HP Home and Home Office Store. Your coupon will be sent straight to your email so you can start saving.

Of course if you are still looking at purchasing truly affordable HP compatible remanufactured cartridges, go no further than stopping by at Metawatch for your supplies.

Hewlett-Packard to sell 3-D printers in May

Stratasys Inc. shipped the first 3-D printers made with the Hewlett-Packard brand under a deal first publicized in January.

The printers will go on sale in France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the United Kingdom next month.

Minneapolis-based Stratasys (Nasdaq: SSYS) developed the printers with Palo Alto-based H-P (NYSE: HPQ). H-P, which has a 3,500-employee campus in Roseville, plans to sell them in the mechanical design market.

Three-dimensional printers use inkjet type technology to make solid models of machine parts and other complex shapes by “printing” them, layer by layer. Users can then test and assemble models of devices to see how well they work before making more costly components.

These printers can make a model directly from a CAD, or computer aided design software, file.

Scott Crump is chief executive officer of Stratasys. The company says it came up with the term “3D printer” when working with IBM Corp. (NYSE: IBM) in the 1990s.

Printer Cartridges Recycling

Check out HP and the Lavergne Group’s advanced processing technology, which is saving money and resource use.recycling hp printer cartridges by crushing into plastic flakes

MONTREAL — Recycling isn’t usually much fun to watch. Those blue bins aren’t too animated. And don’t we all suspect that as soon as the truck turns the corner it all gets thrown in the landfill anyway? That has actually happened in some places when the value of recycled material went into the toilet.

In some cases, we’re going backwards in recycling. Take just the case of plastic water bottles. We produce 29 billion of them a year, and only 30 percent get recycled, which means an escalating amount of waste (expressed in millions of tons).

But plastic water bottles are eminently recyclable, and earlier this week, in Montreal, I saw them put to good use. Hewlett-Packard, which makes the printer cartridges we all pay dearly for, isn’t content to let them go to landfills. These days, they’re being dismantled instead of shredded — a much cleaner process.

The company started recycling cartridges in 1991 (taking back more than 300 million from inkjet and laser printers), and is getting much better at figuring out how to reuse the plastic. Today, a pilot project in a French-Canadian factory is no longer shredding the cartridges (a process that leaves a contaminated mix of plastic, metal and paper), it’s dismantling them for 50 percent greater yields in recovered plastic. Here’s how it works, according to HP’s Dean Miller:

You can send your cartridges back to their maker in a number of ways (there are programs in 50 countries) and the options include mailing them back in pre-paid envelopes and returning them for credit to Staples stores. Either way, they end up at industrial facilities like the one I visited in Montreal.

But they don’t get crushed. In 2005, after five years of work, HP developed a closed-loop system for recycling printer cartridges that, at the Lavergne Group facility I visited alone, handles a million pounds of plastic every month. Closed loop means the plastic lives again as new cartridges. HP has made more than 500 million printer-ready cartridges through the closed-loop process since 2005.

The closed-loop process is like something out of the movie Brazil — a combination of retro mechanical and high tech. Dismantling (especially in this pilot scale) is much slower than crushing cartridges, of course. The dismantler handles 15 cartridge a minute, and the shredder thousands per hour. But the result is much cleaner: The robot arms scrape off the label, lop off the plastic lid, remove the electronic guts and the foam pad, then toss the remaining plastic bucket into a hopper.

Once shredded, the cartridge material is mixed with 75 to 80 percent plastic bottle waste and then (they wouldn’t let us see this part) combined with special chemical additives to make it strong and pliable — in effect, basically the same as virgin plastic again.

from bottles and cartridges to plastic pellets

Until recently, the process handled only easy-to-recycle PET plastic, but last year polypropylene (PP) was added and almost two million cartridges with PP have been processed.

After having received some flak on the issue, HP has also considerably reduced the packaging going into its ink cartridges. There’s no U.S. law mandating that kind of waste reduction, but so-called Green Dot laws in Europe and Asia give impetus to that kind of reform. Green Dot makes manufacturers responsible for their packaging, which in effect gives them huge motivation to reduce the amount they include with products. Buy toothpaste in the U.S. and it comes in the box; buy the identical brand in Europe and it stands on its cap.

Strong corporate lobbies discourage the European approach here, but on March 25 Maine became the first state in the U.S. to enact an extended producer responsibility (EPR) law. And some 19 states have rules requiring takeback of electronic equipment. A national law would tie all of this together, and it will be a brave legislator who shepherds a bill through to passage.

As a car writer, I’m always looking for an auto angle, and I found it in a Lavergne Group office displaying a number of auto parts, including a taillight assembly. They’re all made from plastic recycled in the plant. Lavergne has a contract with Ford to provide plastic for Econoline van front ends, and because of the strong European end-of-life vehicle laws it’s looking at setting up a branch to serve carmakers in Germany.

Knowing about all this should stay your hand when hit by the impulse to throw away that spent printer cartridge. Not only is there money in it (get thee to the nearest Staples story) but properly recycled it will again dispense ink.